This course is designed to be an introduction to the field of ethics.  We will examine ancient and contemporary resources, moving from the abstract problems of philosophical and theological ethics to some of the moral quandaries we face in contemporary society.

In this class, we will explore the connections between religion and violence.Granted that people throughout history have used religious justifications for their use of violence, we will ask if there is something about religious convictions that leave the believer prone to coercive activity, or does violence represent a corruption of a religious sensibility that is essentially peaceful?We will examine several traditions in this regard, with our central focus on Christianity, spotlighting terrorism as the primary example of religiously inspired violence in contemporary society.
To understand what we mean by “democracy,” we will explore the different traditions that drive public policy, governance, and citizen engagement. As we turn our gaze toward democracy in Greensboro more specifically, we will consider the city’s rich history in civil rights and economic justice, as well as the even more powerful desire for civility that has impacted our ability to have deep, community-wide discussion of the area’s struggles.
Is punishment simply a matter of revenge, sanitized by the authority of the state? Is it a response to a Law of Retribution that marks legal systems, but that also underlies morality as a whole? Or does punishment merely perform a desirable social function?

Students in this course will confront these questions while examining the changes in theories of punishment from the middle ages to the modern period. They will also examine the role of mercy in relation to justice, and examine the contemporary debate about the death penalty in America.
The purpose of this course is to engage in a close examination ethics from a distinctively Christian perspective. The class will inspect some of the ways in which Christian thinkers have responded to basic theoretical problems associated with ethics, asking not only what is good but also how the good can be known and why it should be pursued.

In this course, we will examine what it means to think of one's work as a vocation. We will explore the connection between professional life and the vocational perspective, and confront some of the peculiar moral problems that can arise when we find ourselves in specialized occupations. Along the way, we will attempt to develop a picture of the productive life in general in contemporary American society.
In this course, we will get a taste for the ethical perspectives of several of the major religious traditions of the world, and we will explore various practical problems that arise in our increasingly global moral context.
This course is designed to be an introduction to the field of ethics. We will examine ancient, medieval and contemporary resources, moving from the abstract problems of philosophical and theological ethics to some of the everyday moral quandaries of life in contemporary society.